Yummy Pairs

In the “Yummy Pairs” game, the child can advance skills in decomposing numbers that appear as positive integers or quantities using the ten-frame representation, and improve, at the same time, bilateral coordination skills by trying to make symmetrical hand movements.

The child entering into a colorful world of candies, selects the desired avatar to control and tries to match pairs of either numbers or quantities that compose a target number by stretching both hands to reach the two sub-parts. In a joyful and yummy environment, the child advances mathematical thinking and hand eye coordination.

The teacher/therapist can select the range of target number that the child will be asked to make (up to 100) and the difficulty level that concerns the available pairs of numbers from which the child will be asked to choose. Candy game offers unique learning and motoric experiences to the children about how numbers can be broken apart and put back together.

Are you ready to choose the right yummy pairs from candy trees?

Supported goals in

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.NBT.A.1
Math
Grade: K
Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (such as 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.OA.A.4
Math
Grade: K
For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.NBT.B.2
Math
Grade: 1
Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
CA.MATH.K.OA.4
Math
Grade: K
Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from. For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.
MAFS.K.OA.1.AP.4b
Math
Grade: K
For any number from 1-9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number by using objects or drawings
NVAC.MATH.K.OA.A.4
Math
Grade: K
Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from. For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.
NY.MATH.K.OA.4
Math
Grade: K
For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.
NC.MATH.K.OA.4
Math
Grade: K
For any number from 0 to 10, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or expression.
SC.MATH.K.ATO.4
Math
Grade: K
Create a sum of 10 using objects and drawings when given one of two addends 1 – 9.
No supported goals.
VASOL.MATH.K.CE.6
Math
Grade: K
The student will model adding and subtracting whole numbers, using up to 10 concrete objects.

Settings

Setting

Options

I CAN statement

Music

Disable background music.

  • On
  • Off
Sound effects

Disable/enable sound effects 

  • On
  • Off

I CAN understand that there are sounds when I pick a correct or a wrong combination of numbers/quantities.

Select hand
  • Left
  • Right

I CAN select the “Play Bottom” with my left hand.

Time to select item

Time to remain stable to select the correct answer.

Reduce the time if the child shows arm stability & good eye-hand coordination.

  • 0.5 sec
  • 1 sec
  • 1.5 sec
  • 2 secs
  • 2.5 secs
  • 3 secs

I CAN select an answer, holding my right hand still for 3 seconds.

Timer

Time to match the right pairs that compose the requested number.

Disable this if the student feels pressure.

  • On
  • Off

I CAN match the correct pairs of candies under the pressure of time.

Timer value
  • 10 secs
  • 20 secs
  • 30 secs
  • 40 secs
  • 50 secs
  • 60 secs
Game lives

Disable this to continue playing without losing lives when making mistakes.

  • On
  • Off

I CAN learn that if I get an answer wrong, my game lives will be decreased.

Number of questions

Set how many questions you want the students to practice.

  • 5 questions
  • 10 questions
  • 15 questions

I CAN answer 5 questions about composing numbers.

I CAN stay focused for 10 questions.

Number mode

Teachers can determine if the matching pairs will be numeric or quantitative.

  • Quantity
  • Numeral
  • Tens - ones
  • Tens - ones (shuffled)
  • Tens - ones (reversed)

I CAN compose numbers from two pairs of quantities. 

Show numbers

This option shows the quantities in numbers facilitating the composing of quantities.

  • On
  • Off

I CAN compose quantities that are accompanied by numbers.

Game difficulty

This option makes it harder to compose numbers using various strategies in an automatic way (such as ten-base structure and halves).

  • Easy
  • Hard

I CAN compose numbers using the ten-base structure.

Content language
  • English
  • Greek
  • Spanish
Numeric range

Adjust the range to match the student’s abilities.

  • 2 - 10
  • 11 - 20
  • 20 - 100
  • 11 - 99

I CAN compose two one-digit numbers.

avatar
  • 0
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7

I CAN control the movements of the child in the game with my own body movements.

Reports

Pie chart data

This shows statistics of how many times the student gave correct & wrong or no answers how many times the student tried to find the correct answers

The Time is shown on the top right corner. The teacher can use the time to tell whether the task is challenging enough for the students.

 

Graph data

This table shows the time that was passed from selecting a number/quantity from the right and left side. Particularly, it shows the time between left hand (blue circle) and right hand (red circle) for all the attempts. It is clear that this student took the same time trying to select a number using his left hand compared to his right hand. The required strategy of adding doubles was not used and child gave three wrong answers.